Turning to poetry – Hysteria writing prompts for August

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I hope, like me, you’ve been finding it easy to write this summer. It’s lovely to have those bright mornings (best writing time for me) and long evenings that just seem to slip away when we’re busy. I know so many people have been turning to poetry to help set down their thoughts about the virus and the weird way we’ve had to adapt our lives and our relationships. We’ve been switching between fear and hope, worrying about things and feeling confident at times.

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On writing prompts – Hysteria writing prompts for July

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Don’t forget the 2020 competition… the deadline is approaching. If you haven’t already written something to submit, there is still time to do so. For my inspiration this month I’m going to share some ways of playing with words to create writing prompts that make some poetry, stories or just get you started on writing … Read more

Hysteria 2020 April writing challenge with Eithne Cullen

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April the first is not a joke in my household, instead it heralds the start of this year’s Hysteria Writing Competition. And this year our Writer in Residence is Eithne Cullen. Eithne has been given the challenge of coming up with a blog post each month that challenge you to get your thinking hats on and try something new out.

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Waxing lyrical about poetry by Alex Reece Abbott

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The third category for the Sixth International Hysteria Writing Competition is poetry. That means a poem with the very loose theme “things of interest to women.” Oh, and a maximum of twenty lines, not including spaces. Our writer in residence Alex Reece Abbott has asked some award-winning poets and judges from around the world to share their best pointers for writing poetry for her post this month – big thanks go to the fabulous Frankie McMillan; Camille Ralphs; Jane Clarke and Aki Schilz for their support and valuable insights.

Camille has also kindly shared a poetry generator, so even if you’ve never written a poem before, there’s plenty of ideas to get you started for our deadline of August 31 2017. You can enter the poetry category on the Hysteria website.

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Starting with a FLASH! by Alex Reece Abbott

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And we’re off! First up, flash fiction – for the Sixth International Hysteria Writing Competition, that means two hundred and fifty words with the very loose theme “things of interest to women.”

So, what if you could spend five minutes with an award-winning, flash fiction writer and get her to share her top three tips? And, maybe a proven story generator too?

We did it for you.

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Writer in Residence 2017, Alex Reece Abbott

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Greetings! I’m Alex Reece Abbott and I’m delighted to join the Hysterectomy Association as the third Writer in Residence. And we’re counting down to the Sixth International Hysteria Writing Competition for women writers.

  • Don’t forget, Hysteria opens on 01 April 2017 with a deadline of 31 August 2017 GMT
  • No theme, beyond simply “things of interest to women”
  • No limits on your number of entries
  • And yes, you can enter all three categories
    • Flash – 250 words
    • Short Story – 2,000 words
    • Poetry – 20 lines

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Finishing Touches by Sophie Duffy

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So you’ve written your piece to enter the Hysteria Writing Competition 2016? If you haven’t, you’ve still got three weeks in which to do this. You still have time to start and complete a piece, if you crack on with it. If you’ve already finished your poem, flash, or story, then it won’t do any harm to go back over it and check those finishing touches.

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What are your intentions? by Sophie Duffy

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Whatever you are writing for this competition, make sure your piece has honourable intentions. By this I mean, make sure your entry has a point, a story, something to say. A competent use of grammar, a way with words, a quirky style is a good start, but it isn’t enough. You need to leave the judges with an impression that is hard to shake. You need to give your piece of writing a life that will go on after they have finished reading.

Here’s a few things to think about when starting out or redrafting.

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